Tyne Bridge set for £35m funding boost as part of Central Motorway revamp to improve congestion

Maintenance and refurbishment of the Tyne Bridge started in September 2023.
Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now

One of the North East’s most famous icons will shine again as the Government has promised to deliver a £35 million boost to restore the Bridge and secure its future. 

On Friday, February 2, Roads Minister Guy Opperman was in Newcastle to confirm that the Tyne Bridge will undergo an extensive renovation programme, alongside major improvements on the Central Motorway East A167 to tackle congestion and improve journey times in and out of Newcastle.

This is part of the Government’s Network North plan which will improve local transport across the North East, with today’s announcement following £544 million in funding for a long-term plan to resurface local roads across the North East.

With the centenary of the bridge’s opening approaching in 2028, the Government claims investment will safeguard the iconic structure for future generations and help grow the economy in Newcastle and the North East.

Read Newcastle's news on the go with our free email newsletters - bringing the headlines to your inbox. Catch up on the day's news and sport and enjoy even more from the NewcastleWorld team. Visit our website here to find out more and sign up.

Roads Minister Guy Opperman said: “Today is a historic day for Newcastle and the North East. Our £35 million boost will restore the Tyne Bridge in all its glory so that it can shine proudly as one of the UK’s most iconic landmarks.

“This is part of the Government’s Network North plan which will improve local transport across the North East, with today’s announcement following our record £544 million in funding for a long-term plan to resurface local roads across the North East.”  

Work on the bridge initially started back in September 2023. The first phase of the £32 million programme will see engineers begin erecting scaffolding below the bridge deck around the Gateshead tower, which councils claimed will have minimal impact on the travelling public.

The main phase of work was postponed until funding was confirmed by the Government, with Newcastle and Gateshead Councils waiting for the millions to be signed off in Westminster.

The full project is expected to take around four years to complete.

As part of the bid for funding, it was confirmed the Government will provide £35.3 million, with the remaining costs contributed by Newcastle and Gateshead councils.

The Government has also claimed every penny of the £19.8 billion committed to the Northern leg of HS2 will be reinvested in transport across the North. Criticism initially came from Northern residents after it was announced roads in London would also benefit from the funding of the scrapped project.