Premier League threatened as rule change impacts Newcastle United, Everton, Man United & Man City

The Premier League rule change will impact the likes of Newcastle United, Manchester United, Everton, Chelsea and Manchester City.
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The Premier League has come under fresh scrutiny after a vote by clubs to toughen rules on associated party transactions was passed on Friday.

English top-flight clubs initially met in November to discuss putting a temporary block on third-party loans, while a proposal to block associated party commercial deals unless there is proof of multiple offers of the same value was also put forward. Neither motion received the required amount of votes.

The clubs who reportedly voted against the temporary ban on January loans were Newcastle United, Manchester City, Chelsea, Everton, Nottingham Forest, Burnley, Wolverhampton Wanderers and Sheffield United. However, at the latest Premier League shareholders meeting last week, it is understood two reversed course allowing the latest motion to pass and change what is and isn’t permitted.

(Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images)(Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images)
(Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images)

The Premier League said: “Following a full review of the existing associated party transactions rules and fair market value assessment protocols, clubs agreed to a series of amendments to further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of the system."

However, according to The Telegraph, Man City are understood to be threatening the Premier League with arbitration to prevent the changes. Sky News adds that the league has allegedly been warned that the changes are unlawful in English competition law.

Newcastle are 80% owned by the Public Investment Fund of Saudi Arabia and last summer agreed a £25million-a-year front-of-shirt sponsorship deal with PIF-linked events company Sela under the Premier League's fair market value rules. PIF also own one of four Saudi Pro League teams - Al Nassr, Al Ittihad, Al Hilal and Al Ahli - but it isn't necessarily viewed as a 'multi-club model'.

That is unlike Man City, who are one of 13 clubs involved in the City Football Group while Chelsea's owners recently purchased a majority stake in French club Strasbourg.

Sir Jim Ratcliffe's Ineos, who are set to purchase a 25 per-cent in Manchester United, also owns Ligue One side Nice and Swiss Super League side FC Lausanne-Sport. Everton are subject of a proposed takeover by US group 777 Partners who operate an extensive multi-club ownership strategy, including the likes of Sevilla, Genoa, Standard Liege and Hertha Berlin.